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for former new york city mayor who died friday at 88. then, a program with former u.s. navy sniper who was killed saturday in texas. followed by the prime minister's discussing the year -- the future of europe. >> on tuesday congressional budget office director rid of these is the disease 2013 budget and economic look. live starting at 2:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. also at 2:00 p.m., a bipartisan group of house members unveiled and trafficking legislation. you can watch that live on our companion network, c-span three. >> she said in her memoirs it was like a bright and beautiful dream. the most wonderful time of my life. the event that gives you some idea of how much she enjoyed being first lady in death she thought that her husband had finally achieve the recognition he deserved. >> historian on julia brand who married her brothers and west point roommate ulysses s. grant. first ladies, influence and damage, public and private lives, interests, and influence on the president's produced with the white house historical association preseason one begins present state of your 18th at
economies and more specifically, city economies. similarly we talk about manufacturing as a category, that's a little overbroad because manufacturing is a million subcategories that added to this pos or ble category. so the same way you broke down and said here's the specific cities do well and can have lessons for the american economy in the aggregate, what are some subset is right now that is a leading-edge the rest of the super sector came learn from? >> just a pretty fine point on your initial comment, top mattress in the united states said on 12% of land ask him a two of population, three quarters of gdp and on every asset that matters, 75, 80, 85% national share. so it's really hard to talk about an american economy. you really have to talk about network throughout the rest of the world. for a long time we focused a lot on the consumption economy in a wal-mart is that wal-mart is a wal-mart about whether phoenix, pittsburgh, denver, detroit. same footprint, seem designed, same price as, wages. when you start looking at advanced manufacturing, what you see is the effective cost areas
through many different synagogues in new york city and that employer's association essentially came and said they belief in standard and guideline answer they believe that having standards and guidelines was actually in the employer's interest as well. because they were tired of the very arbitrary, unpredictedble, as much as it's a wild west for workers. it can feel that way for employers as well they created a supportive space for employers to come together. talk about their experiences. employers what their struggling with and grappling with them and supported them to understand what some good guidelines might look like. >> something you can download. >> you. it's on the website on the domesticemployers.org. the association is national called hand and hand. and under the notion that healthy homes and god workplaces go hand and hand. we were -- we did all kinds of educational forums with organizers. we're organizing together in a neighbor called park slope in new york in brooklyn to create a neighborhood-wide code of care. where employers and workers and local businesses and local
international problem city was not part of the larger part. >> may have some into that equates one of the oddities of the white paper and i think it's a very ripe area to follow-up is exactly what work the word imminent is doing. it's not clear from reading the white paper whether the word imminent is in his tent to get over domestic constitutional hurdles, whether it comes to international law or whether it is an attempt to get around domestic criminal prohibitions as an affirmative defense in criminal prohibitions or whether it flows and some other neat. it's simply there is an apparently self-imposed complain and it's not clear what legal problem it's designed to solve. some of the questions you asked would be different depending what were the word imminent is doing. i talk about this in my written statement, but it's an area with this committee pushing the administration's clarification. >> thank you and a thank you, mr. chairman. >> the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. komar for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. this is an exceedingly tough it. we appreci
because it's indiscriminant killing, and in the old days you throw a rock over the wall of the city and you didn't see who you killed, and that's like nuclear weapons. if they used catapults then, today would be nuclear weapons. there's various arguments in that, and people tend to say, oh, that's just religion. people are rational. that's not quite true. religious lines in the middle east are critical. i think that once iran goes nuclear, we're going to have a severe sunni-shiite play, and it's seen as a shiite's bomb threatening the sunni dominance in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that, a pakistani nuclear presence, an extended, and pakistan nigh extended tee -- deterrents in saudi arabia. they financed the nuclear program. they have prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this is going to raise the question regarding, for the first time, second strike capability against india which would c
is secured and others are not as secure. we note or a city as san diego and el paso that count themselves as great improvement in button that used to take knowledge he operational control primarily because they're border stations there. we know there's 1993 miles of border, 653 borders of fencing and one might make the argument he unfenced area is less secure. i would argue against that. one of the things we need to ensure we allow the border patrol to do is to advise us of how they believe using the right resources can effectuated secure border. it is always moving. one of the issues is what we have done such as in 2004 working with senator kerry be provided the answer to the original request by the border patrol and that his equipment. i was the year we presented the chairs, laptops, night goggles, all the enhanced equipment. but we know those kinds of resources are not the only answer to border security. but i would like to see us to master row comes with the use of newtek knowledge he had at the same time as we move forward on to knowledge he and having the border patrol responded in
for your police force for all of philadelphia. but in reality, if you can't cover the city and you can do a lot of things, the one s.w.a.t. team can never be decisive. that is where we found ourselves the begin with a significant evolution and it began to change dramatically. >> in somalia, the task force ranger had be been there a month or two before the big battle that i wrote about. during that time, they had launched six missions. so the pace was intelligence gathering, finding targets, planning and operations, sometimes very quickly. once that intelligence came together, then launching it. described what a temporal up-tempo means and how that applied in iraq? >> that's exactly right. there were eight series of these that happened a number of days apart. so you gather intel, you get it together, you make a decision. you set yourself criteria to launch when the criteria are there. but it's a pretty centralized, deliberate process. we were originally doing that, and we would have this precise thing. what we found is that we were having a very narrow slow effect. we would capture all tho
of defense when you look and say in a benghazi or, you know, i don't want to go city by city for obvious security reasons. when you look at them, how often do you determine we'll take a look this week and see where with e are security wise. i know, state is a big part. >> the best thing we did is state asked us to join a team that would look at security at 19 embassies and determine what was needed there in order to better secure those facilities. and i think based on that, it gives us the opportunity to then demy additional -- additional marine if we have to take additional steps to make sure that those embassies are not vulnerable. so we do work with the state department when asked to try to help provide some guidance with regards to security. >> how often is a review done in some of these places, for instance, a benghazi. do they -- is it on a -- when the ambassador says, things are getting tougher, or every couple of weeks is it looked as it is deor ituated or gotten better. what kind of matrix is used? >> well, you know, look. the primary -- the primary matrix for that has to rest w
cities with the same prg. there is tremendous variation in total cost of care primarily around hospitals readmissions and as she lists a postacute care. we are really tried to figure out what is the best way for hospitals to work with acute care providers to reduce readmissions and to make sure that there is a much more balanced distribution of spending in the postacute care spending channels that we have. so we set sort of a set number of drgs and the ones that hospitals can choose to participate in. hospitals have the choice to choose which drgs they want to take and we have different models. some articles combined by position hospital and some combine the hospital in the acute. we are really trying to figure out what works and what doesn't work and one hypothesis is different bottles will work differently in different parts of the country given how dramatically different health care provider mix is and the difference across the country and the cost and the quality of care. we have tried to balance to foster creativity but also having standardization so we can assess what works and wha
. the remains well respect did in the city and surrounding area today. that being said in the years since the attleboro plant was closed in the cancer rate amongst former employees have been specifically affected those men and women employed by the company to 1963 in 1961 t. i was involved in the program. that's part of the energy employee compensation program for department of labor, money has been made available to those workers now suffering from crippling illness. i know ta has designated point person for oic and i commend you for doing so. what i'm hearing from many residents in the district is very few of the thousands of employees in the area or even a way that this program access and its benefits available to them at all. they seem minimal outreach efforts to ensure those in need know how to get the help they so deserve. i read this week about steve totten in a local newspaper. his brother also has cancer. his wife and father both died of cancer. all four worked in the attleboro plant. yesterday he spoke to larry darcy who is diagnosed in may may 292. leroux anonymously to credit
economy. in addition to the business, support to ordinary citizens. many towns, cities have protested against the closing of mail. the post office is an important part of the town's identity and communication center. many people do not have access to the internet. according to recent study by the pew center, one in five do not use the internet. 40% of american bills do not have broadband access. senior citizens, those with less than high school education and those in low income households are the least likely to have internet access. for the 36 years before the passage of the p8 ea, the postal service is always changing from a manual process seen operation to an automated operation. to those changes come and spend the world's best postal system. to do this by identity technologies and challenges. the postal service has been well aware of the impact of the internet in developing strategies to deal with it. from 2000 through 2006 before the passage of the p8 ea, postal service reduced approximately 100,000 people, almost 80,000 came from representation. since the passage, they have redu
and nutrition with a goal of raising 50 million out of poverty over the next decade alone. city kids are going back to work. grandparents ranchers, farmers are having their own online dating service, and the most talked about super bowl commercial courtesy of the late paul harvey, was the dodge ram tribute to the american farmer. what is that kenny chesney song? she thinks my tractor is sexy? [laughter] you know, there is truth to that. it is increasingly important. it turns out that it was february 21 of 1865. 140 years ago today. patent number 46,454 was issued. i won't give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled the john deere plow. but the implements sketched implement sketched out on the pitch could just as easily been labeled as one of the most important events of american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and the dead and it did. it made it possible for talent like aberdeen, south dakota, before the plow, plowing a full acre took a good 24 hours. afterwards, it took about five hours. there was an assumption of what the land could produce. that is not just a story of
director for the city of chicago and has a special place in her life for it. so thank you, inc. you very much. i would also like to recognize jimmy camp who is here, who's head of the foundation was named for his father, who is the secretary of hud, who i have set in the past with a kind of good working definition of bipartisanship's. it was jack can buy himself. i'm not. [laughter] >> and jimmy was -- he attended the hearing that we had across the country, which were really important in gathering information from across the nation. we thank you in the foundation for your involvement. when the commission began its work, one of the first actions was to examine key demographic trends occurring across the country. an effective housing policy only responds to today's needs, but also anticipates those of the future. our nation is undergoing a profound transformation of society. we are becoming more likely to delay marriage and childbearing and more racially and met with many diverse. members of the echo boom generation, 62 million americans born between 1981 and 1995, they are now beginning t
and cities and i don't remember wisconsin but i know for single women it's anywhere from 19,000 to 29,000 that's just minimal, all of those things that are absolutely necessary. so i think everyone says -- i work with a lot of organizations and everyone will say well, that we need one-on-one especially for like the latino groups and we need one-on-one for everyone really. that is what everybody wants and you sort of know that from your research as well. i think what is really important is senior centers and places where people can actually come for help. finra has this great project on libraries and there are that many of them. i think there are 25 they funded. i've been to a number of them doing programs with them. they are incredible. so there ways that we could do this but there is no coordination, no reach nationally except through these little programs that the national council on aging does a great initiative as well. so i don't know what will happen after this administration. >> thank you. >> senator franken. >> thank you. this topic brings up so many -- so many subjects about
towards a freer environment of the city and move from the south to the north and that is what most people did. in the process of doing that, some of it became politicized. >> host: because they expected things to be markedly different in the north. they didn't think racism was in the north. >> guest: in the north they are not going to be murdered for taking a stand. and so in the relatively freer environment they are able to really create the conditions for the modern movement. >> host: talk about some of the people of the movement. those in sncc and those nclc and others. who were the people who'd -- was a king, was that nocco max? was that the death of medgar evers? >> guest: all of the above. all of them had different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain this is rosa parks made martin luther king possible. martin luther king didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give a per seat on the montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. it's because of rosa parks that we are talking
and greatrandn country and its merited nation's largest city, a community looks at the texas and america of tomorrow.ity immigration for all of us is a more than a political issue. it's who we are as americans. from plymouth rock to ellis island and galveston, texas, to the sandy shores of florida, immigrants have made or is the greatest country in the world. today, however, our immigration system is badly broken. but there is hope. this hearing, and more important thisrtisan legislation that i believe can be enacted becauseie of it shows we are on the cusp e of real progress. the president and a growing the pr for maker so they defamer for whates americans support, comprehensive, commonsense reform. we messed up these three things further strengthen border do security, streamline the legal immigration process so companier get the work they need in this e 21st century global economy and create a path to citizenship to bring the estimated 11 citi undocumented immigrant in this country out ofth the shadows and into the full life of the of th american dream. an texas, we know firsthand the
to owning my own business and joined the state legislature in california for six years. been on the city council for ten of los angeles and now i'm a member of congress as of january of this year. >> what did the president say that resonated with you tonight? >> what i like the most about what he said when it came to immigration reform, he basically said let's get this done now. i think we have a window of opportunity of bipartisan cooperation for republicans and democrats by large agree we need to do something. let's hope we can work on the -- working on out of the senate and in our house and get something comprehensive to the president right away. >> what was the experience like for you tonight? what time can -- did you go to the chamber to get our seat? >> about an hour and a half early. i got seat close enough to aisle i was able to shake his hand and say thank you, mr. mr. president before he went to the podium to make the speech. >> do the republicans have a chance of working the immigration issue positively? >> i think they do. i looked toward the republican side of the room, we
accomplish. i like to tease people in california there is the global capital content in one city in a car right where's the global capital of technology. for some reason the same country and state is to go couldn't figure out how they needed each other and raskin all of us to make a choice. pick one site has it been the end will benefit if one loses one and. content is technology. technology needs content. i'm working to find ways in which we can bridge this gap and a lot is happening. we're stepping up on the first pages, illegal sites and add brokers, payment processors to make sure we strip the financial advantages that of illegal sites as well. we will have a site opened up in the next three weeks that would give people the chance to learn unintentionally they've been downloading the product without any punitive implications, working on the assumption that most people ever form something they are doing outside of the legal space full text pearce or any number of things occurring in that area. you have asked a question, but i'm not enthusiastic about legislation. read to find ways to a
economic growth, while contributing to america's energy independence. for instance, the los angeles city council approved a 25 year $1.5 billion project to buy a solar power produced at the indian nation in the southern nevada desert. when it goes online in 2016, it will be the largest solar power plant on tribal land. capturing race to power over 118,000 los angeles homes. in addition to the plan itself, over 900,000 solar panels will be built on a reservation, creating more jobs in industries that tomorrow. one way to ensure projects like this is to promote fair, equitable tax policy. like all government, tribes must collect and manage their own taxes. right now, tribal governments don't have the same taxing authority by states. a flock of governments, we will continue working with federal partners to fix these policies have the economies grow and become a source of strength and her family of nations. sovereignty is how we secure communities and how they can secure nations and how we will secure future. this is our greatest challenge. a quarter of people in poverty, traced the national
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19

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